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Think Long-Term When Remodeling Your Home

Remodeling is an investment of time, money, and energy. Whatever changes you make, you want them to work for your family for many years. The key is to anticipate and plan for the future with timeless, adaptable designs.

How Far Ahead to Think When Remodeling Your Home

Of course, it’s reasonable to consider your family’s current needs when planning a renovation. Maybe some aspects of your home have bothered you since the day you moved in, such as the kitchen layout, flooring material, or cabinet style. But it’s also wise to consider the future.

For instance, perhaps you’re a family of four crammed into a two-bed house. You could add a third room and call it good, but if you plan on having more kids in the future, it pays to put a fourth room in as well. Such forward-thinking ensures you end up with a home your family can grow into in the coming years.

Just how far ahead should you look when remodeling your home? We recommend considering your needs 10 to 20 years from now to maximize the longevity of your renovation.

Trendy Remodeling Blunders to Avoid

Short-term trends or stylish additions that make your home less convenient to live in will make you say, “What was I thinking?” five years from now. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but here are some interior trends you’re most likely to regret in the future:

  • All-white color schemes
  • Wood ceilings
  • Oversized tubs
  • Patterned floor tiles
  • Low-rise backsplashes
  • Vibrant-colored appliances
  • Trash compactors
  • Pot racks

Timeless Designs to Include in Your Remodel

Plenty of interior design trends come and go in just a few years. Thinking “timeless” instead of “trendy” can save you money, reduce waste, and ensure your home remains stylish in the long term. Of course, creating a beautiful home is about striking a balance between timeless and trendy.

You can always repaint the walls, replace throw pillows and area rugs, and put up new window coverings when your current ones go out of style. These inexpensive design elements are the right places to incorporate short-term trends. On the other hand, you should design high-ticket items for longevity.

Here are some timeless designs we recommend including in your remodel:

  • Built-ins
  • Gas fireplaces
  • Hardwood flooring
  • Stone countertops
  • Neutral-colored cabinets
  • Stainless steel appliances

Adaptable Designs to Future-Proof Your Home

You may not have mobility restrictions now, but if you think you’ll stay in your home well into your golden years, plan ahead for potential mobility changes that often come with age. Incorporating adaptable, aging-in-place designs today can save you time and hassle on future improvements.

Remodeling the bathroom? Add tile behind the vanity in case the cabinets need to be removed eventually to create wheelchair access. Replacing the kitchen cabinets? Incorporate slide-out shelves for improved accessibility. Adding a master suite? You might as well put it on the ground floor.

Wentworth Studio Can Help You Think Long-Term

If you’re ready to renovate your home, choose Wentworth as the source for all your remodeling needs. We offer architecture, design, and construction services all under one roof to help simplify your project. Our thorough design process includes helping clients think long-term. We’ll listen to your current desires, ask about your potential future needs, and craft a timeless design that melds the two. With our help, you’ll end up with a home that works for your family today and for many years to come.

To begin the home remodeling process, please call us at (240) 383-1226. We’ll work hard to exceed your expectations every step of the way.

“ A number of the design elements I could easily envision from the plans and knew I would like, such as the arched French doors, window over sink, pantry. But others came to life for me only in the implementation. Standing in the doorway of the small bedroom, for example, is one of my favorite views; the arched cubby is beautiful. ”

Glover Park Client, Washington, DC